Bug Type: Wood Destroying Insects

12/31/2012

Subterranean Termite

(Length: 1/8″ – 3/8″) These are social insects living in colonies in the soil. The colony is made up of workers, soldiers and reproductives. Subterranean termite colonies feed on wood or other cellulose material such as paper, cardboard and fiberboard.

12/30/2012

Subterranean Termite Swarmer

(Length: 1/2″) These dark brown to black winged insects are the male and female reproductives. They emerge from the colony in a dark cloud at least once per year. Their short flight drops them to the ground where they then seek the proper conditions for the king and queen to start a small brood chamber in the soil.

12/29/2012

Formosan Subterranean Termite

(Length: About 1/2″) Like subterranean termites, Formosan termites feed on cellulose material (i.e. wood), but they are more aggressive and attack wood at a much faster rate.

12/28/2012

Drywood Termite

(Length: Up to 1/2″) This termite species does not live in the ground, but lives inside wood. They are most likely to be found in humid, coastal areas. Their colonies are much smaller than subterranean termites, and infestations found in wood are usually confined to a small area.

12/27/2012

Drywood Swarmer

(Length: about 3/16″) These brown flying insects, identified by 3 darker veins on the front edge of their wings, swarm in late Spring and early Summer.

12/13/2012

Powder Post Beetle

(Length: 1/8″ – 1/4″) Adults are reddish brown to black and very slender. The powder post beetle damages seasoned hardwoods such as flooring, furniture and structural woods. The larva, living in and eating the wood, can take up to four years to develop.

12/13/2012

Old House Borer

(Length: 1/2″ – 3/4″) This is a member of the group known as “long-horned beetles”. Eggs are laid in crevices of the bark of cut logs. The whitish larva live 3-5 years or more, eating through the wood.

12/13/2012

Carpenter Bee

(Length: 3/4″ – 1″) These large dark bees that resemble bumble bees are often seen hovering around the eaves of a house, wooden fences or the underside of a deck in the late spring. They bore round holes into wood to nest.